20 April 2021

Proforest launches Agrovita with PepsiCo Mexico and PepsiCo Foundation

Proforest launches Agrovita with PepsiCo Mexico and PepsiCo Foundation

Three-year programme in Tabasco and Chiapas to benefit 37,600 people living in the production landscape

Proforest is leading the technical work in a new sustainable landscape programme launched today by PepsiCo. Agrovita is a three-year programme focused on PepsiCo’s supply chain for plantain, cocoa and palm production in the Tabasco and Chiapas regions in southern Mexico. PepsiCo and Proforest are focusing on agricultural and social factors within the landscape and communities. 

Proforest is leading the initial engagement with suppliers and communities to understand what support is needed, and to understand the local governance structures, review existing initiatives and identify local partners. The goal is to create long-term agreements for sustainable production. 

Social development will encompass local communities, people working in the plantations and their dependents. This will include improving their nutrition, access to potable water, as well as health and safety and sanitation for workers. Outreach will be sensitive to any local needs to isolate during the pandemic, while also supporting vulnerable communities at this time. 

In parallel, Proforest will be working on the agricultural programme to improve processes and implement best practices, in line with PepsiCo’s focus on regenerative agriculture. Proforest will also work with PepsiCo and stakeholders to look at how progress towards positive environmental and social outcomes can be measured at the landscape level.  

“The production landscape in Mexico is complex and there are individual and interconnected issues across commodities,” said Esteban Figueroa, Principal project manager at Proforest. “Challenges like forest conversion, water management, lack of access to food and water, labour conditions and smallholder support, need to be collectively addressed at the landscape level. Alongside PepsiCo Mexico, we will be working with government authorities, local communities, producers, civil society and other companies to ensure all voices are heard and there is local ownership of the Agrovita programme and progress.” 

The landscape programme is one of the focus areas of PepsiCo’s Positive Agriculture agenda. The global food and beverage company today launched new 2030 goals to spread regenerative farming practices across 7 million acres (nearly equal to its entire agricultural footprint), improve the livelihoods of more than 250,000 people in its agricultural supply chain, and sustainably source 100% of its key ingredients. 

Agrovita is one of the flagship programmes to meet the ambition of improving livelihoods of more than 250,000 people in its agricultural supply chain and communities, including economically empowering women. As part of this, PepsiCo will focus its work on the most vulnerable farming communities linked to its global value chain, including smallholder farmers and farm workers, women and minority farmers. 

“We have an inalienable commitment to the Mexican agriculture. With Agrovita, we are taking a step forward in our journey to develop our small agricultural communities, including female farmers, in the Mexican Southeast. We bring investment, technology, and innovation to detonate the region’s agricultural vocation to its fullest potential,” said Roberto Martínez, President of PepsiCo Mexico Foods. 

“All of our work is directed by eight positive social and environmental outcomes, and it is the long-term, sustainable impact we are working towards,” said Daniel Arancibia, Co-director of Proforest Latin America. “PepsiCo has been an incredible partner, recognising that as a company involved in the production and sourcing of agricultural commodities it needs to work beyond its own supply chains to impact people and planet at scale. We are immensely proud to offer our technical skills to meet the ambitions of such a leading food and beverage company in Mexico.” 

Categories: Landscape Approaches, Latin America, Palm oil, Cocoa

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